To Be More Than Equal 2 – Martin Delany to Africa 1859 by Jim Surkamp

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Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 1 by Jim Surkamp June, 2021 video link: https://youtu.be/oHBTnaDgMvY

Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 1 summer, 1859 by Jim Surkamp June, 2021 Credits video link: https://youtu.be/AJ0Ch2XvlEM

Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 2 summer, 1859 by Jim Surkamp June, 2021 Credits video link: https://youtu.be/AiSi7oDRM0k

Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 2 summer, 1859 Credits video link https://youtu.be/EqQYMkiKrgk

Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 3 summer, 1859 video link: https://youtu.be/UnDvxC0dEc

Martin Delany to Africa – To Be More Than Equal 3 summer, 1859 Credits video link: https://youtu.be/66yJR6mvWKE

Flickr – 137 images https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimsurkamp/albums

THESE BEGINNING-T0-END, SEQUENCED IMAGES ARE FROM THE LINKED TO VIDEO WITH THIS SCRIPT. THE SCRIPT’S TEXT IS COMPLETE AND IS BROKEN DOWN TO MATCH TO THE IMAGE SHOWN WITH IT DURING THE VIDEO. – JS

SOURCE: Delany, Martin R. (1861). “OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE NIGER VALLEY EXPLORING PARTY.” New York, T. Hamilton https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001610366

This is the second part a 3-part of a series about Martin Delany, born in 1812 in Charles Town, then Virginia going on to be the first African-American field officer in the U.S. Army, organizer in 1859 of a year long scientific expedition in West Africa, Harvard educated physician, co-editor of The North Start with Frederick Douglass, author of several books including one of the very first important novels by an African-American. It was called “Blake: The Huts of American,” the story of a traveling insurrectionist serialized in the Anglo-African magazine in 1858-1860. After Lincoln met him in February, 1865 in the White House, the President immediately sent a memo to his Secretary of War, stating: “Do not fail to have an interview with this most intelligent and extraordinary black man.”

With Sonny Luckett as Martin Delany and Dr. Momodou Darboe narrating

Made possible with the generous, community-minded support of American Public University System (apus.edu) to encourage fact-based discussion into the foundational issues from which our nation has evolved.

Land Ho! “The arrival of Martin Robison Delany in Liberia is an era in the history of African emigration, an event doubtless that will long be remembered by hundreds of thousands of Africa’s exiled children.” Richard Blackett – The Journal of Negro History
Vol. 62, No. 1 (Jan., 1977), pp. 1-25 (25 pages) Published By: The University of Chicago Press p. 15 – as quoted from The Liberian Herald approx. July 12, 1859 – jstor.org
https://www.jstor.org/stable/2717188?read-now=1&refreqid=excelsior:0176342a6a76eee8dfe11072629f097c&seq=15#page_scan_tab_contents%22%20rel=%22noreferrer%20nofollow

“Persons from all parts of the country came to Monrovia to see this great man.” – Martin R. Delany and Robert Campbell: Black Americans in Search of an African Colony
Richard Blackett – The Journal of Negro History p. 15 – jstor.org

Ridiculed and ignored in America for speaking, embraced by the thousands here for speaking – how strange.

:00 – Lamplight by Vandaliariver.com over intro images to :39 :00 – FX birds, seagulls, ocean waves over images 1-7 to :44
:00 – Waterdogs 4 by Cam Millar (cammillar.com) over images 1-7 to :44

Images 1-5 – fair use images from Master and Commander The Far side of the World directed by Peter Weir – youtube.com https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0k-0BzXV8w4
Image 6. Map of the West Coast of Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas, including the colony of Liberia Contributor Names: Ashmun, J. (Jehudi), Young, J. H. (James Hamilton), Finley, A. (Anthony). Created / Published: Philad[elphi]a [Pa.] : A. Finley, 1830. loc.gov
https://www.loc.gov/item/96680499/
Image 7. fair use images from Master and Commander The Far side of the World directed by Peter Weir – youtube.com

:45 – syncopation, cheering crowds and singing over images 8-20 to 3:24

Image 8. fair use images from Master and Commander The Far side of the World directed by Peter Weir – youtube.com
Image 9: “The arrival of Martin Robison Delany in Liberia is an era in the history of African emigration, an event doubtless that will long be remembered by hundreds of thousands of Africa’s exiled children.” The Journal of Negro History Vol. 62, No. 1 (Jan., 1977), pp. 1-25 (25 pages)
Published By: The University of Chicago Press p. 15
Image 10
Image 11
Image 12
Image 13
Image 14: Ridiculed and ignored in America for speaking, embraced by the thousands here for speaking – how strange. – Douglass fighting a mob in Indiana – Douglass, Frederick. (1881). “Life and times of Frederick Douglass,” Hartford, CT: Park publishing. p. 285 – hathitrust.org https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015018652357&view=1up&seq=291&q1=Indiana
Image 15: Image in color of gala event in French influenced West Africa
Crowder, Michael. (1977). “West Africa: An Introduction to Its History.” London: Longman Group, Ltd. p. 110
Image 16

“The regeneration of the African race can only be effected by its own efforts, the efforts of its own self and whatever aid may come from other sources; and it must, in this venture succeed, as God leads the movement and His hand guides the way.” – Delany, Martin R. (1879). “The Origin of Races and Color,” Baltimore, MD: Black Classic Press. p. 94 books.google.com

Be thou like the noble Ancient — Scorn the threat that bids thee fear; Speak! — no matter what betide thee; Let them strike, but make them hear! Be thou like the first Apostles — Be thou like heroic Paul; If a free thought seek expression, Speak it boldly! speak it all ! Face thine enemies — accusers; Scorn the prison, rack, or rod! And, if thou hast Truth to utter. Speak! and leave the rest to God. Truth and Freedom by William Gallagher – 1861

Image 17: “Face thine accusers, scorn the rack and rod and, if thou hast truth to utter, . . Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division, The New York Public Library. (1930 – 1969). digitalcollections.nypl.org https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47df-a10b-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Image 18: ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 19: ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 20. River crossing Africa – Crowder, Michael. (1977). “West Africa: An Introduction to Its History.” London: Longman Group, Ltd. p. 110

2:12 – Sona Jobarteh & Band Kora from West Africa over images 21-43 to 4:48

Images 21 & 22 Hochschule für Musik FRANZ LISZT Weimar – Sonah Jobarteh – Acoustic Guitar/ Kora/ Vocals/ Maurice Brown – Acoustic Guitar = Andi McLean – Electric Bass/ BVs – Mouhamadou Sarr – Djembe/ Congas/ Calabash/ BVs – www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig91Z0-rBfo

Delany wrote: Saturday, July 10th, 1859I landed on the beach at Grand Cape Mount, Robertsport, amid the joyous acclamations of the numerous natives who stood along the beautiful shore, Delany, Martin R. (1861). “OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE NIGER VALLEY EXPLORING PARTY.” New York, T. Hamilton; https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001610366https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003702209&view=1up&seq=26&q1=Robertsport
Just north is the homeland of Shango, Delany’s grandfather, the Mandinko chief. Grandma Grace Peace told the Delany children how Shango was captured and shipped to America. A whipper tried to whip Shango in order to as Delany said: “leave him completely broken, as humble as a dog, as spiritless as a kitten.” Delany wrote that he personally observed on his trip in 1839 to Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas an example of exceeding cruelty and should be read or not read accordingly. THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT FACT OF HISTORY BY A CREDITABLE SOURCE WHO IS BLACK. Not for children or teens . Delany, Martin R. (1859-1861 serialized). “Blake; or, The huts of America, a novel.” With an introd. by Floyd J. Miller. Boston: Beacon Press. books.google.com p. 175 https://books.google.com/books?id=0ZV2AAAAQBAJ&pg=PT226&lpg=PT226&dq=as+s” rel=”noreferrer nofollow

Shango was killed in a fierce fight with the other man. Grandma Graci Peace passed on this story to Martin. But Mandinko tribes always have a griot or story-rememberer to pass on their history.

Observing the countryside, Delany wrote that he wondered why the coffee bean farmers didn’t plant their trees further, say twenty feet, apart. The History of Coffee, Part 1: Africa and Arabia
by Judy Fleisher June 04, 2017 scribblerscoffee.com
https://scribblerscoffee.com/blogs/news/the-history-of-coffee-part-1-africa

Image 23 – Old map of the Coast of West Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas including the colony of Liberia, compiled chiefly from the surveys and observations of the late Rev. J. Ashmun https://www.loc.gov/resource/g8882c.lm000002
Image 24 – Old map of the Coast of West Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas including the colony of Liberia, compiled chiefly from the surveys and observations of the late Rev. J. Ashmun https://www.loc.gov/resource/g8882c.lm000002
Image 25 – Hillside view of Robertsport, Liberia Date 8 February 2009, 10:31:58 Author mjmkeating https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertsport
Image 26 – Mandinko Dancing by Woman Attribute shaunamullally https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandinka_people#/media/File:Mandinka_Dancing,_Women’s_Cultural_Celebration,_Gambia_2006.jpg
Image 27 – Hillside view of Robertsport, Liberia Date 8 February 2009, 10:31:58 Author mjmkeating https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertsport
Image 28 – flora of Liberia by Dr. Otto Stapf; 28 coloured illustrations by Sir Harry Johnston, 24 botanical drawings by Miss Matilda Smith https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MandingoMap-1906_with_color.png
Image 29 – Mandingo chief – Mayer, Brantz. (1854). “Captain Canot; or Twenty years of an African slaver: an account of his career and adventures on the coast, in the interior, on shipboard, and in the West Indies.” New York, NY: D. Appleton & Co. frontispiece https://www.gutenberg.org/files/23034/23034-h/23034-h.htm
Image 30 Jefferson County Courthouse, Charles Town,. WV Deed Room
Image 31 – Sunday morning by Winslow Homer – 1877 Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH artsandculture.google.com https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/sunday-morning-in-virginia-winslow-homer-american-b-1836-d-1910/LAGM6vILPVXXuQ?ms={“x”:0.652,”y”:0.44665664913598807,”z”:10,”size”:{“width”:0.696,”height”:0.5980465815176559}}
Image 32 – Shipped back in net – The Underground Railroad – The National Park Service – 1998 – Washington, D.C.: Dept of the Interior p. 21 Musee d’L’Homme; slave ship – Mariners’ Museum, Newport News, Va. https://archive.org/details/undergroundrailr00unit/page/21/mode/1up
33a Image – 33a. Mayer, Brantz. (1854). “Captain Canot; or Twenty years of an African slaver: an account of his career and adventures on the coast, in the interior, on shipboard, and in the West Indies.” New York, NY: D. Appleton & Co. frontispiece https://www.gutenberg.org/files/23034/23034-h/23034-h.htm 33b. Strother, David H., “Virginia Illustrated.” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, New York, NY: Harper and Bros. Volume 11, Issue: 63, (Aug., 1855). p. 289 – Tim Longbow – https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015056090072&view=1up&seq=299
Image 34. – Martin Delany – ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 35 – – Martin Delany – ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 36 – Mandiken chief – Mayer, Brantz. (1854). “Captain Canot; or Twenty years of an African slaver: an account of his career and adventures on the coast, in the interior, on shipboard, and in the West Indies.” New York, NY: D. Appleton & Co. frontispiece https://www.gutenberg.org/files/23034/23034-h/23034-h.htm
Image 37a – Mandiken chief – Mayer, Brantz. (1854). “Captain Canot; or Twenty years of an African slaver: an account of his career and adventures on the coast, in the interior, on shipboard, and in the West Indies.” Image 37b – Sunday Morning in Virginia by Winslow Homer – 1877 – Cincinnati Art Museum – https://www.gutenberg.org/files/23034/23034-h/23034-h.htm
Image 38 – Sona Jobarteh & Band Kora from West Africa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig91Z0-rBfo
Image 39 – Sona Jobarteh & Band Kora from West Africa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig91Z0-rBfo
Image 40 – Griot Kora performer Sona Jobarteh

Observing the countryside, Delany wrote that he wondered why the coffee bean farmers didn’t plant their trees further, say twenty feet, apart. Delany, Martin R. (1861). “OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE NIGER VALLEY EXPLORING PARTY.” New York, T. Hamilton, Niger Valley p. 22 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003702209&view=1up&seq=32&q1=coffee
Wednesday July 13, 1859
Arriving at Monrovia
Learning the 23rd Psalm
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm 23&version=KJV
(spoken on video in background) The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.
He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil:
for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies:
thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely, goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life:
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever)
At Monrovia’s missionary schools, the classes are being rigidly prosecuted
(Forever and ever Amen (in Yoruba))
The missionaries seem to be doing a good work,
there being many earnest and faithful laborers among them of both sexes, black and white, and many native teachers
They are shrewd, intelligent, and industrious, with high conceptions of the Supreme Being. Delany quotes unnamed missionary in Monrovia

Image 41 – The History of Coffee, Part 1: Africa and Arabia by Judy Fleisher June 04, 2017 https://scribblerscoffee.com/blogs/news/the-history-of-coffee-part-1-africa” rel=”noreferrer nofollow Martin Robison Delany – https://ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 42 – A coffee farmer, Francois Dadi Serikpa, from Gnamagnoa in Côte d’Ivoire, joined Nestlé’s Nescafé Plan 10 years ago https://www.itrealms.com.ng/2020/10/nestle-boosting-coffee-production-in.html
Image 43 – A coffee tree planted in an adequate life zone, allowing for strong, healthy growth. Credit: Alvaro Llobet
Image 43a – Historical Map of Africa by J. Bartholomew, F.R.G.S. John Bartholomew (1831 – 1893) was a Scottish cartographer, born in Edinburgh. http://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/africa_1885.jpg

4:09 – FX ocean waves over images 44-45 to 4:23
4:09 – seagulls over images 44-48 to 4:35

Image 44 – fair use images from Master and Commander The Far side of the World directed by Peter Weir https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=master+and+commander+far+side+of+the+world
Image 45 – The Africa We Don’t See on Tv Ivory Coast facebook.com https://www.facebook.com/theafricawedontseeontv/photos/pcb.1506835356109083/1506835136109105/?type=3&theater
Image 46 – Map of the West Coast of Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas, including the colony of Liberia by Ashmun, J. (Jehudi), Young, J. H. (James Hamilton), Finley, A. (Anthony) – Philad[elphi]a [Pa.] : A. Finley, 1830. https://www.loc.gov/item/96680499/

2:53 – Sona Jobarteh & Band Kora from West Africa over images 21-43 to 4:48, resumes 47-69 5:06-7:05

Image 47 – Map of the West Coast of Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas, including the colony of Liberia by Ashmun, J. (Jehudi), Young, J. H. (James Hamilton), Finley, A. (Anthony) –
Philad[elphi]a [Pa.] : A. Finley, 1830. https://www.loc.gov/item/96680499
Image 47a – Liberia and its vicinity. Monrovia to Cape Palmas https://www.loc.gov/resource/g8880.lm000009/?r=0.021,0.371,1.218,0.636,0
Image 48a – Ashmun Street with houses and a church, Monrovia, Liberia. Created / Published 1893. https://www.loc.gov/item/2002695198/ Image 48b. – Map of the West Coast of Africa from Sierra Leone to Cape Palmas, including the colony of Liberia Philad[elphi]a [Pa.] : A. Finley, 1830. https://www.loc.gov/item/96680499
Image 49 – Ashmun Street with houses and a church, Monrovia, Liberia. Created / Published 1893. https://www.loc.gov/item/2002695198
Image 50 – Monrovia street – Project Canterbury Handbooks on the Missions of the Episcopal Church.
Liberia New York: The National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1928. http://anglicanhistory.org/africa/lb/missions1928
Image 51 – Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 p. 459
The Great Scholar – https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=479
Image 52 – Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 p. 458 Charley reading book – https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=478
Image 53 – Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 p. 461 woman at chalkboard – https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=481
Image 54 – Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 p. 460
older collegian https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=480

Images 55-58 are identical to images 52-54 in the video but with different perspectives

Image 59 – At Monrovia’s missionary schools, the classes are being rigidly prosecuted. The missionaries seem to be doing a good work, – Martin Robison Delany https://ahec.armywarcollege.edu/
Image 60 – Forever and ever Amen (in Yoruba)https://depositphotos.com/stock-photos/black-man-praying.html
Image 61 – there being many earnest and faithful laborers among them of both sexes http://anglicanhistory.org/africa/lb/missions1928/
Image 62 – and many native teachers – Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 woman at chalkboard p. 461 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=481
Image 63 – They are shrewd, intelligent, and industrious, with high conceptions of the Supreme Being, The Thankful Poor by Henry Ossawa Tanner – 1894 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thankful_Poor
Image 64 – Martin Delany – https://ahec.armywarcollege.edu

“As soon as you can convince them that there is a mediator in Jesus Christ to whom you may talk, but cannot see, you make Christians of them. Many flee violence at home in favor of the peace-loving individuality of being a Christian.”

Image 65 – http://ee.umc.org/what-we-believe/ask-the-umc-when-was-the-first-african-american-bishop-elected
Image 66 – http://anglicanhistory.org/africa/lb/missions1928/
Image 67 – “as soon as you can convince them that there is a mediator in Jesus Christ to whom you may talk, but cannot see, you make Christians of them.” Crayon, Porte. “On Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly September 1874 School’s Out Hurrah p. 457 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b000541503&view=1up&seq=477
Image 68 – “Many flee violence at home in favor of the peace-loving individuality of being a Christian.” Golah hut – Project Canterbury Handbooks on the Missions of the Episcopal Church. Liberia
New York: The National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1928. http://anglicanhistory.org/africa/lb/missions1928/
Image 69 – Same source as Image 68 http://anglicanhistory.org/africa/lb/missions1928

6:25 – FX mumbling hear hear over images 70-73 to 6:40
6:25 – FX applause over images 70-73 to 6:40

Images 70-73 & 76 – Montage Group of men and one woman from loc.gov collection Liberia
starting extreme upper left hand corner moving clockwise 1. Edward Morris, 2. James Skivring Smith 3. John Hanson, 4. unidentified woman, 5. Urias A. McGill, 6. James B. Yates, 7. Edward J. Roye, 8. C. H. Hicks, (to viewer’s left of Roye, same row), 9. James M. Priest, 10. Alfred Francis Russell, 11. Philip Coker https://www.loc.gov/collections/daguerreotypes/?q=American+Colonization+Society
Image 71
Image 72
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The fundamental principle of every nation is self-reliance, with the ability to create their own ways and means: without this, there is no capacity for self-government . In this short review of public affairs, it is done neither to disparage nor underrate the gentlemen of Liberia with whom, from the acquaintance I have made with them in the great stride for black nationality, I can make common cause, and hesitate not to regard them, in unison with ourselves, a noble band of brothers.Delany, Martin R. (1861). “OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE NIGER VALLEY EXPLORING PARTY.” New York, T. Hamilton p. 24 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003702209&view=1up&seq=34&q1=self-government

Image 88 – PAN AFRICAN FLAG Pan-African Culture Club (facebook)

King Cotton shapes history on three continentsA history of the British cotton industry by Claire Hopley https://britishheritage.com/history/history-british-cotton-industry

7:36 – Family Bonds by Cam Millar over image 89-95 to 8:49

Image 89a (Images 89a-89q – all have the same background: Asoke linen https://youramba.com/blogs/news/50891267-history-and-glossary-of-african-fabrics )
Image 89b.
Image 89c
Image 89d
Image 89e
Image 89f
Image 89g
Image 89h
Image 89i
Image 89j
Image 89k
Image 89l
Image 89m
Image 89n
Image 89o


89q. TITLE: the brainchild of the white slavers of the American Colonization Society, such as Bushrod Washington, but instead in Egba under the laws of Egba chieftains, joining the cotton farmers, becoming then the world capital of the Free Kingdom of Cotton. Jamaican-born, Robert Campbell, a partner with Delany in this enterprise, wrote: “There is certainly no more industrious people anywhere and I challenge all the world besides to produce a people more so, or capable of as much endurance. Those who believe, among other foolish things, that the Negro is accustomed lazily to spend his time basking in the sunshine, like black-snakes or alligators, should go and see the people they malign.” A pilgrimage to my motherland. An account of a journey among the Egbas and Yorubas of Central Africa, in 1859-60. by Robert Campbell https://www.loc.gov/resource/gdclccn.05014430/?sp=9

Image 89p
Image 89q
Image 89r – Reversed image of painting of Supreme Court Justice Bushrod Washington (1762–1829) in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. Date 1828 https://npg.si.edu/object/npg_NPG.2017.80
Image 89s
image 90 – Sagbua Okukenu became the first Alake of Egbaland, ruling between August 8, 1854 to August 31, 1862.[3] Prior to the appointment of the Sagbua Okukenu in 1846, Shomoye was installed as regent for one year, between 1845 and 1846, and following the demise of Oba Okukenu in 1862 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alake_of_Egbaland_
Image 91 – Rotating Blue Marble NASA Observatory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laiVuCmEjlg
Image 92 – The Blue Marble – Next Generation shows incredible detail of the Earth https://www.nasa.gov/images/content/136038main_bm_swath.jpg
Image 93 – https://www.wealthresult.com/agriculture/lucrative-cotton-farming-nigeria
Image 94 – Rotating Blue Marble NASA Observatory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laiVuCmEjlg
Image 95 – National Humanities Center Resource Toolbox – The Making of African American Identity: Vol. I, 1500-1865 – Robert Campbell A Pilgrimage to My Motherland An Account of a Journey among the Egbas and Yorubas of Central Africa in 1859-60 https://www.loc.gov/resource/gdclccn.05014430/?st=gallery

9:28 – Olatunji over images 96-105 to 10:06
Babatunde Olatunji – Drums of Passion Live ’85 Archives World Music youtube.com

Image 96 – Drummer Men, A Yoruba Culture from Nigeria is a painting by Chioma Kanu fineartamerica.com https://fineartamerica.com/featured/drummer-men-a-yoruba-culture-from-nigeria-chioma-kanu.html
Image 97 – Same as Image 95 source
Image 98 Same as Image 9 source
Image 99 – Same as Image 95 source
Image 100 – Same as Image 95 source
Image 101 – Same as Image 95 source
Image 102 – Same as Image 95 source
Image 103 – Same as image 95 source
Image 104 – Same as image 95 source
Image 105 – “A pilgrimage to my motherland. An account of a journey among the Egbas and Yorubas of Central Africa, in 1859-60.” https://www.loc.gov/resource/gdclccn.05014430/?sp=9 – Kente linen https://youramba.com/blogs/news/50891267-history-and-glossary-of-african-fabrics

10:07 – Sona Jobarteh & Band Kora from West Africa over images 106-119 to 10:53 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig91Z0-rBfo

Image 106 – Nigeria: As CBN Targets 300,000 Cotton Farmers https://kohantextilejournal.com/nigeria-as-cbn-targets-300000-cotton-farmers/

107-118 Linens https://youramba.com/blogs/news/50891267-history-and-glossary-of-african-fabrics

” . . . the natives cultivating it for the manufacture of cloths for their own consumption. Its exportation is, therefore, capable of indefinite extension.”

Image 107 – ADINKRA – the natives cultivating it for the manufacture
Image 108 – ADIRE – of cloths for their own consumption
Image 109 – BATIK
Image 110 – EWEIts exportation is, therefore, capable
Image 111 – KHASA of indefinite extension.
Image 112 – KENTE
Image 113 – KORHOGO
Image 114 – KUBA
Image 115 – MANJAKA
Image 116 – BROCADE
Image 117 – AFRICAN TIE-DYED
Image 118 – AFRICAN PRINTS
Image 119 – Kente fabric/cotton – youramba.com – cotton kohantextilejournal.com

10:55 – Rule Britannia by U. S. Army Strings over images 120-121 – 11:10 wikipedia.org

Image 120 – Royal_Coat_of_Arms_of_the_United_Kingdom wikipedia.org https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Coat_of_Arms_of_the_United_Kingdom_ – Kente fabric youramba.com
Image 121 – Same as 120.

He (Delany) read in the August 13th issue of the West African Herald: “King Dahomey is about to make the great Custom in honor of the late King Ghezo. Determined to surpass all formal monarchs, a great pit has been dug which is to contain human blood enough to float a canoe. Two thousand persons will be sacrificed on this occasion. The king has sent his army to make some excursions at the expense of some weaker tribes. The younger people will be sold into slavery. The older persons will be killed. Whole villages are taken. For Dahomey’s 5,000 celibate, enslaved, machine-like Amazonian warriors, Abeokuta was an object of their frenzied hatred, because Abeokuta defeated them in a war and even captured a general and made off with the sacred umbrella of the late King Gezo (Ghezo). King Ghezo died, some believed, because he defied a prophecy that if he invaded Abbeokuta – a “safe city against slavers” – he would pay the price. He tried. He was defeated. He died in 1858.

Image 122 – he read in the August 13th issue of the West African Herald: The West African Herald masthead
the first African-owned newspaper in West Africa, in 1858. It was circulated at first to only about 300 subscribers – 2/3 of them Africans – and endured for sixteen years, stimulating a proliferation of African-owned newspapers later in the 19th century. pbagalleries.com

11:16 – Alice Bort, Laura First, Ardyth Gilbertson over images 123-124 to 11:24
11:24 – KODO over images 123-135 to 12:27 – KODO World Tour 51:30-51:56 – youtube.com
12:47 – Shana Aisenberg (shanasongs.com) banjo over images 136-137 to 13:15

Image 123 – tapestry depicting several kings of Dahomey and their regnal years
Ivana Madzarevic – Own work wikipedia.org
Image 124 – King Dahomey is about to make the great Custom in honor of the late King Ghezo. – 124a – tapestry depicting several kings of Dahomey and their regnal years
IvanaMadzarevic – Own work wikipedia.org https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_of_Dahomey ; 124b Français: Le roi Ghézo et le prince royal Bâhadou. English: King Ghezo and the Royal Prince Badohou. Date 1 January 1863 Source Le Tour du monde, volume 7 [1] Author Valentin Foulquier (1822–1896) commons.wikimedia.org https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Le_Tour_du_monde-07-p085.jpg
Image 125 – Determined to surpass all formal monarchs – victims for sacrifice – From The history of Dahomy, an inland Kingdom of Africa 1793 – New York Public Library Author Archibad Dalzel wikipedia.org https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahomey#/media/File:Victims_for_sacrifice-1793.jp
Image 126 – a great pit has been dug which is to contain human blood enough to float a canoe. Two thousand persons will be sacrificed on this occasion. newspaper clipping The Constitution Cork Advertiser Friday November 2, 1860 – bahamianology.com https://bahamianology.com/800-slaves-sacrificed-in-tribute-on-the-death-of-gezo-the-great-slave-king-of-dahomey-1858/
Image 127 – The king has sent his army to make some excursions at the expense of some weaker tribes. People are taken as slaves.
Image 128 – The younger people will be sold into slavery. bahamianology.com https://bahamianology.com/800-slaves-sacrificed-in-tribute-on-the-death-of-gezo-the-great-slave-king-of-dahomey-1858/
Image 129 – The older persons will be killed – Portrait of an Old Man by Gerard Bhengu artnet.com http://www.artnet.com/artists/gerard-bhengu/portrait-of-an-old-man-72jjIqIC6DCqzbdNsbvPng
Image 130 – Whole villages are taken – Portrait of an Old Man by Gerard Bhengu – artnet.com ; Captured Africans Liberated from a Slaving Vessel, East Africa, 1884 ; Martin Delany ahec.armywarcollege.edu https://ahec.armywarcollege.edu
Image 131 – For Dahomey’s 5,000 celibate, enslaved, machine-like Amazonian warriors, Abeokuta was an object of their frenzied hatred, because Abeokuta defeated them in a war and even captured a general. – Forbes, Frederick E. (1851), “Dahomey and the Dahomans.” Vol. 1 London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, library.si.edu https://library.si.edu/digital-library/book/dahomeydahomansb00forb
Image 132 – and made off with the sacred umbrella of the late King Gezo (Ghezo). – Ghezo, King of Dahomey Date 1851 Source From Dahomey and the Dahomans – New York Public Library [1] Author Forbes, Frederick E. wikipedia.org https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghezo
Image 133 – ornaments and skulls Ghezo, King of Dahomey Date 1851
Source From Dahomey and the Dahomans – New York Public Library [1] Author Forbes, Frederick E. facing p. 81 archive.org https://archive.org/details/dahomeydahomansb00forb/page/n369/mode/1up?view=theater
Image 134 – human sacrifice – Source From Dahomey and the Dahomans – New York Public Library [1] Author Forbes, Frederick E. facing p. 80 archive.org https://archive.org/details/dahomeydahomansb00forb/page/80/mode/2up?view=theater
Image 135 – King Ghezo died, some believed, because he defied a prophecy that if he invaded Abbeokuta – a “safe city against slavers” – he would pay the price. – King Ghezo – bahamianology.com https://bahamianology.com/800-slaves-sacrificed-in-tribute-on-the-death-of-gezo-the-great-slave-king-of-dahomey-1858/ – ornaments and skulls Ghezo, King of Dahomey Date 1851
Source From Dahomey and the Dahomans – New York Public Library [1] Author Forbes, Frederick E. facing p. 81 archive.org https://archive.org/details/dahomeydahomansb00forb/page/n369/mode/1up?view=theater
Image 136 – He tried. He was defeated. He died in 1858 – Same source as image 132

SOURCE:

THE POLITICS OF COMMERCIAL TRANSITION: FACTIONAL CONFLICT IN DAHOMEY IN THE
CONTEXT OF THE ENDING OF THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE by Robin Law
University of Stirling York University, Ontario p. 227
https://dspace.stir.ac.uk/bitstream/1893/280/1/politics-of-commercial-transition.pdf

12:44 – banjo by Shana Aisenberg images 137-138 to 13:14

“Farewell, farewell my loving friends, farewell. . . The jasmine smells of Africa are tonight less fragrant than my scented memory of soft honey-suckled summer’s night breezes in Virginia long ago, and awaking to the mockingbird.”

Image 137
Image 138
Image 139 – The Banjo Player by William Sidney Mount 1856 – The Long Island Museum of American art, History and Carriages, Stony Brook, United States artsandculture.google.com https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/the-banjo-player-mount-william-sidney/WAFqaiSKzQ1JlA?hl=en